Archives of Pediatric Infectious Diseases Archives of Pediatric Infectious Diseases Arch Pediatr Infect Dis http://www.pedinfect.portal.tools 2322-1828 2322-1836 10.5812/pedinfect en jalali 2019 6 26 gregorian 2019 6 26 5 2
en 10.5812/pedinfect.39477 Evaluation of Serum 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D Levels in Children with Acute Bronchiolitis Evaluation of Serum 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D Levels in Children with Acute Bronchiolitis research-article research-article Conclusions

This study showed that there is no significant difference between children with acute bronchiolitis and normal children in terms of serum 25 (OH) D levels. It therefore seems that 25 (OH) D does not play any role in the pathogenesis of acute bronchiolitis. Further studies in this area are recommended.

Results

The mean and standard deviation of 25 (OH) D serum levels were 26 ± 9.5 and 23.3 ± 8.3 ng/mL in the case and control groups, respectively. No significant difference was observed between the two groups in terms of 25 (OH) D serum levels (P = 0.11).

Background

According to some reports, 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25 (OH) D) deficiency leads to respiratory diseases. Given the high prevalence of acute bronchiolitis in young infants, the assessment of 25 (OH) D status is very important for this disease.

Methods

In the present study, 57 patients with acute bronchiolitis (case control) were compared with 57 healthy children (control group) in terms of 25 (OH) D serum levels. The serum levels of 25 (OH) D were measured using the ELISA method. The results were analyzed and compared between the two groups.

Objectives

This study was conducted to determine the relationship between the serum levels of 25 (OH) D and acute bronchiolitis in young infants.

Conclusions

This study showed that there is no significant difference between children with acute bronchiolitis and normal children in terms of serum 25 (OH) D levels. It therefore seems that 25 (OH) D does not play any role in the pathogenesis of acute bronchiolitis. Further studies in this area are recommended.

Results

The mean and standard deviation of 25 (OH) D serum levels were 26 ± 9.5 and 23.3 ± 8.3 ng/mL in the case and control groups, respectively. No significant difference was observed between the two groups in terms of 25 (OH) D serum levels (P = 0.11).

Background

According to some reports, 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25 (OH) D) deficiency leads to respiratory diseases. Given the high prevalence of acute bronchiolitis in young infants, the assessment of 25 (OH) D status is very important for this disease.

Methods

In the present study, 57 patients with acute bronchiolitis (case control) were compared with 57 healthy children (control group) in terms of 25 (OH) D serum levels. The serum levels of 25 (OH) D were measured using the ELISA method. The results were analyzed and compared between the two groups.

Objectives

This study was conducted to determine the relationship between the serum levels of 25 (OH) D and acute bronchiolitis in young infants.

Acute Bronchiolitis;25-Hydroxy Vitamin D Acute Bronchiolitis;25-Hydroxy Vitamin D http://www.pedinfect.portal.tools/index.php?page=article&article_id=39477 Abolfazl Mahyar Abolfazl Mahyar Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Qazvin Children Hospital, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Qazvin Children Hospital, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Parviz Ayazi Parviz Ayazi Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Qazvin Children Hospital, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Qazvin Children Hospital, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Marjan Abbasi Marjan Abbasi Pediatrician, Department of Pediatrics, Qazvin Children Hospital, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Pediatrician, Department of Pediatrics, Qazvin Children Hospital, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Reza Dalirani Reza Dalirani Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Mofid Children Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Mofid Children Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Tel: +98-2122227021, Fax: +98-2122220254 Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Mofid Children Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Mofid Children Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Tel: +98-2122227021, Fax: +98-2122220254 Alireza Taremiha Alireza Taremiha Specialist of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Qazvin Children Hospital, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Specialist of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Qazvin Children Hospital, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Amir Javadi Amir Javadi Biostatistician, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Biostatistician, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran Shiva Esmaeily Shiva Esmaeily MSc in Statistics, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran MSc in Statistics, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran